Runbritain FAQs

  • Which race results are eligible for inclusion?

    We only include race results for events which hold a UKA licence or TRA permit. A full list of licensed races can be found at http://www.runbritain.com/races (There's a past races archive button on the left for looking up older races).

    Home nation race results are included as shown on the relevant Northern Ireland, Scottish and Welsh governing body sites.

  • When will my result be added?

    Race organisers have up to 7 days to sort out any queries and submit their results via the Race Directors Portal under the terms of their UKA licence. Some may take a little longer. Most will be added within a few days of the race. parkruns are imported on a Monday afternoon / evening and will normally be available by Monday evening / Tuesday morning.

    Please keep an eye on the Results page (top centre). When the word "Full" appears to the right of the race name then the results are ready to check/claim. When the race name is in red - we are already aware of the results and they are in the processing queue or being monitored. If you click on the race name you will be taken to the race or timing company site where you can view your result.

    Performances can be added to your profile either via the runbritainrankings Add Performances page (top left) once logged in (select distance, year then your race and enter your time as shown in the official results) or by clicking on the envelope next to your result using the Results page (top centre) - click on the word "Full" to see the top 1500 results. It will only work if you’re logged in.

  • Which results count towards my handicap score?

    A runner's handicap score is the average of their top 5 performances (those marked with a +) and is calculated using various elements including the SSS, the VSSS, a time decay (if someone hasn't raced for a while) and a conversion of the time over the distance to a number.

  • My result is wrong...

    The results, which are archived within runbritainrankings, are exactly the same as those produced by the organisers of each race.

    Please contact the race organisers in the first instance, to raise a query, if your time is wrong or you have transferred your number. Once your result has been corrected please let us know and we will change it if, and only if, we can verify it against an updated official version.

    This also applies to parkrun results.

    If there is a minor spelling mistake in your name or club details you can still claim your result by logging in and then clicking on the envelope beside it. If there were more than 1500 people in the race and you were outside the top 1500 people please contact admin@runbritainrankings.com for assistance.

  • Why has my time been rounded up?

    Times are rounded up as per IAAF and UKA rule 165.24:

    “For all races, the time shall be converted to 0.1 second and recorded to the whole second. All read times not ending in zero shall be converted and recorded to the next longer whole second, e.g. 2:09:44.3 shall be recorded as 2:09:45.

    Note: The official time shall be the time elapsed between the firing of the starting gun (or the synchronised start signal) and the athlete reaching the finish line. However, the time elapsed between an athlete crossing the start line and the finish line can be made known to him, but will not be considered an official time.”

  • Can I add my overseas result?

    Overseas races (including overseas parkruns) are added on a discretionary basis. If the race is already listed on the results page (top centre) please log in and use the Add performances page to add your result.

    It will only work if you’re logged in. Races are listed by location. If not initially listed, please type part of the race name in the box just below the list, and click on the Find button.

    If it’s not listed please log in and use the following form to tell us of any races you'd like us to include and be sure to put a direct link to the results page showing your name and time in the notes box:

    http://www.runbritainrankings.com/submit/submitmeeting.aspx

    Once you have submitted it please be patient - we will add it as soon as we can. We can only add results that we can verify so please make sure that we can see your actual result easily.

  • When is the National Ladder updated?

    We try to update the National Ladder at least once a month. We’re no longer able to do this once a week due to the increase in number of races that we now add. If you click on the National Ladder tab (top right) the date of the last update is shown at the top.

    Please note - the National Ladder is only open to those who are eligible to represent the UK in international competition (ie UK passport holders). Non-UK eligible athletes are more than welcome to maintain a profile to collect race results but these are not ranked against domestic athletes.

  • What do SSS / VSSS mean?

    The SSS is a difficulty score based on how easy or difficult it was to run a quick time in a given race. The harder it was to run a quick time, the higher the SSS score. The way it is worked out is by looking at people's times in a particular race and comparing it against their previous performances. As a very simplified example, if 100 people run in race A one weekend, and the same 100 run in race B over the same distance the next weekend, if, on average, the field is 60 seconds slower in race B than race A, there was clearly some factor (be it weather conditions, accuracy of course measurement, type of terrain, competitiveness of the field, how hilly the course was etc) which caused times to be slower. Therefore the SSS for race B will be higher than the SSS for race A.

    Sometimes the system doesn’t have enough data to run the calculations properly – for example if there were only a small number taking part and only a few of them have profiles so we have limited access to previous performance data. In this situation the system gives a notional value of 1.0.

    The vSSS gives a score for how people did in comparison to the rest of the field in that race on that day, the lower (more negative) this is - the better the performance. The vSSS is the difference between the overall race's SSS score and what your performance alone calculated the SSS to be (what we call the MySSS). The race's SSS is an average of competitors' MySSS scores.

    The vSSS is not an indication of what the system thinks you are capable of running based on your other results. To see what times (for various distances) would qualify for inclusion or improve your handicap please see the handicap calculator on your profile. There is a time decay built in so that the handicap score represents current racing form as opposed to how well people were running at some point previously. People have to regularly record performances which are as equally good as their top 5 to just stay at the same handicap.

  • My log in doesn’t work...

    Are you definitely trying to log in to runbritainrankings (not runbritain.com)? The two sites look very similar and are part of the same family but run off different registration data.

  • Why can I no longer add my training mileage?

    The training section, where you were able to record your weekly mileage, was introduced in 2010 as part of the Reward Running competition that now uses race results only. In 2015, we connected with Strava so you are now able to link your Strava profile from your handicap profile page and this has proven to be more popular.

    To activate this connection, you need to go onto your runbritainrankings profile page and click the Connect button that is underneath your profile picture. (You can also disconnect this from your Account page). When you click the button, you will be taken to an authorisation page on Strava if you have an account, or it will go to Strava to explain what Strava is with links to register and/or sign in. Once you have connected, a Strava orange badge will be visible on your profile page and anyone will be able to click it to see your Strava page where you have information of the training you have done in order to achieve your performances. This will give a much broader picture of your training, racing and activity.
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